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Canada Popular Places to Visit

Prince Edward Island

Prince Edward Island

The smallest province in Canada, Prince Edward Island is famous for red sand beaches, red soil, potatoes, and the irrepressible Anne of Green Gables. It also is known as the "Birthplace of Confederation." The Confederation Bridge which joins Prince Edward Island to New Brunswick takes just ten minutes to cross, with no wait times.

July to October you’ll find water warm enough to swim in; September, celebrate the fall harvest at the Food Network chef-led Fall Flavours festival and the oysterpalooza that is the PEI International Shellfish Festival.

In 2012, Zagat named PEI the second best foodie getaway in the world. Test the theory at any of the spots on the culinary trail, including a stop at the island’s first artisan distillery, which still sells the area’s once-famed moonshine. Leaving the island without sampling a Mooey Gooey cone from cow's creamery is a recipe for regret.

Charlottetown, Canada

Lunenburg

Lunenburg

BRIGHTLY COLORED HISTORIC homes dot the south shore of Nova Scotia on the edge of the Atlantic Ocean like a nautical postcard from the past. Each wave of newcomers has influenced the food, culture, and architecture, making downtown Lunenburg, now dotted with galleries and shops, a National Historic and UNESCO World Heritage site. In this port community of fishermen and shipbuilders, the waters guided their livelihood then and now.

Through the nineteenth and well into the twentieth centuries, Lunenburg became famous for the quality of its schooners, which fishermen sailed to the fish-rich Grand Banks off Newfoundland and the Western Bank off Sable Island. 

Lunenburg's European influences show up in locally made Solomon Gundy fish paté and sauerkraut. Local vendors sell produce, fish, and hand-knit hats and sweaters at the year-round farmer's market, open Thursdays. Check in at NorseBoat, which crafts traditional sailboats and rowboats.

Nova Scotia, Canada

The Laurentian Mountains

The Laurentian Mountains

North America's first ski lift was built in the Laurentians in 1931, and by the late 1930s "snow trains" had brought tens of thousands of Montreal skiers to the slopes. Ever since, the Laurentians have been Montreal's four-season playground. 

The Laurentian Mountains cover 22,000 square miles of territory just north of Montreal in the southern part of Quebec. The Laurentian Mountains with its many peaks and lakes are a majestic presence in Mont-Tremblant Canada displaying incredible landscapes. This vast and welcoming region is a popular tourist destination offering a long list of activities all four seasons of the year.

 Restaurant L'ambiance at Manoir Saint-Sauveur features sophisticated epicurean treats such as Quebec prime rib of veal, Boileau deer, piglet from the Gaspor farm, and grilled Marieville duck breast; Sunday brunch featuring Bellevue salmon and maple butter pancakes is a weekend ritual. Diners at airy, modern maestro in Saint-Sauveur tend to be locals and the menu is eclectic, from pork belly and lobster sandwiches for lunch to duck confit and barbecue chicken for dinner.

 

Quebec City, Canada

Lake Winnipeg

Lake Winnipeg

Lake Winnipeg is one of the world's largest freshwater lakes—clean. Manitoba residents know its thousand-plus miles of shoreline are worth preserving: They include some of Canada's whitest, best beaches, serviced by 30 diverse communities, including Gimli (a name from Norse mythology meaning paradise), a separate Icelandic nation called New Iceland until 1887. Anglers fishing for walleye and perch, sun-worshippers seeking Caribbean-like powder-white sands, and kiteboarders harnessing the winds to sail or even snowkite across the vast expanses of water or ice consider Lake Winnipeg their all-season getaway.

One of North America's oldest continuous ethnic festivals, the Icelandic Festival of Manitoba(held since 1890) takes place in Gimli early August. The annual celebration draws 50,000 visitors seeking to "embrace their inner Viking." Family-focused events, including a folk music festival and fireworks, center on a circa A.D. 800 living history village, where a hundred re-enactors don authentic Viking garb. Wind sports are best in early spring and late fall, although dry suits are recommended for the chill. In winter, add the increasingly popular sport of snowkiting on the lake to the list of activities; by land, snowmobiling and Nordic skiing are popular on the shore.

Manitoba, Canada

L\'anse Aux Meadows

L'Anse aux Meadows

At the tip of the Great Northern Peninsula of the island of Newfoundland, the remains of an 11th-century Viking settlement are evidence of the first European presence in North America. The excavated remains of wood-framed peat-turf buildings are similar to those found in Norse Greenland and Iceland.

Artifacts found at the site show evidence of activities including iron production and woodworking, likely used for ship repair, as well as indications that those who used the camp voyaged further south. 

The Gaia Art Gallery carries moose antler carvings, silver jewelry, and Innu tea dolls woven from smoke-tanned caribou hide, beads, and cotton. For keepsakes with a Nordic twist, the Heritage Shop of L'anse aux Meadows stocks historical books, knitwear, pottery, and music during the summer months.

Newfoundland, Canada

Eastern Townships

Eastern Township

Called the Eastern Townships, or, en françaisCantons-de-l’Est, the highway-connected area south of the St. Lawrence and north of the U.S. border offers visitors a multitude of ways to experience what it has to offer.

A trip to the French countryside might be a little ambitious for a getaway, but this country’s very own French Canadian countryside will do very nicely – and you don’t have to worry about exchange rates or passports. East of Montreal you’ll find green fields, rolling hills, stunning sprays of wildflowers, rivers and lakes, mountains, and a series of small towns.

Eastern Townships is an all-season destination. Winter offers downhill skiing at Mont Orford, ice fishing on Lake Massawippi, and snowshoeing, cross-country skiing, and snowmobiling on trails throughout the region. Summer is busiest, with golf, tennis, sailing, kayaking, windsurfing, fishing, hiking, and biking. Spring and autumn bring fewer crowds and colorful foliage.

 

Quebec City, Canada

Churchill

Churchill 

While in Churchill, take in some of its extensive fur trade history, adventure kayaking, hiking and outstanding cuisine (Arctic Char is a must!). So get set for your once in a lifetime tundra experience in Churchill.

Polar bears and beluga whales are just two of the main attractions that bring hundreds of international visitors to Churchill every year. The town is also famous for its nightlife, as one of the world's premiere viewing destinations for the aurora borealis (northern lights) that dance in the sky some 300 nights each year.

In the summer, white beluga whales surface and plunge in the blue-green waters of the Churchill River. You'll be within talking distance of the most vocal whales in the world. More than 3,000 beluga whales come in early July to feed and calve. Seals can also be seen in the harbour and caribou are frequently sighted along the coast, and polar bears laze in the purple fireweed. Churchill is also a birdwatchers' paradise-some 250 species of birds including the rare Ross Gull, nest or pass through on their yearly migrations.

In the fall, you can see why Churchill is known as the "Polar Bear Capital of the World" as hundreds of bears pass through and around the town on their way out to the freezing Hudson Bay ice. You can watch the bears from the comfort of a heated tundra vehicle, or get up close and personal with the arctic landscape with a walking excursion on the bears' turf. No matter how you do it, a winter northern safari is a once-in-a-lifetime experience. 

You can see the aurora borealis (northern lights) all year round when they make an appearance in the northern night sky. Blue, green and white in colour, they enchant visitors on clear nights in a performance worth waking up for. According to legend, the northern lights will dance their way down to earth if you whistle at them. Why not give it a try?

 

Manitoba, Canada

Charlevoix

Charlevoix

Charlevoix is a beautiful region of the province of Quebec in Canada. Famous for its idyllic topography of rolling hills and mountains along the St. Lawrence River, the landscape is actually the result of the impact of a massive meteorite that crashed down millions of years ago and created a deep crater nearly 60 kilometers in diameter.

Charlevoix attracts visitors because of its agritourism and regional farm-to-table cuisine, arts and culture, and scenic driving routes. In addition, the small towns that dot the region are lovely places to stop and soak in Quebec's history via the architecture and regional charm.

Let yourself fully appreciate the picturesque nature here, or if it’s culture you’re drawn to, spend an afternoon wandering art galleries in Baie-Saint-Paul. Take a mouth-watering tour of all the local products and end the day off at cozy lodgings worth posting about. In colder months, drift among the ice floes in a sea kayak, hit the ski slopes, or even hop on a snowmobile to explore the beauty of the coast and the gems of the backcountry. Drift yourself into a mesmerizing sensory experience in Charlevoix.

 

Quebec City, Canada

Cape Breton

Cape Breton

Cape Breton Island, ranked as one of the top Islands in North America by Travel + Leisure magazine, is home to the Cabot Trail which has received accolades in USA Today’s 10 Best Motorcycle Trips, MSN Travel’s 10 Most Underrated Attractions, and Zoomer’s 7 Greatest Road Trips.

Cape Breton is known for its Celtic culture and welcoming spirit. The kitchen parties, fiddle music and step dancing are natural parts of life on the island. If that’s not for you, don’t worry! There is a lot going on to keep you entertained year round. From concerts, dinner theatres, play festivals to hockey games, there’s something for everyone.

The Celtic Colours Festival is an annual music and entertainment festival highlighting Cape Breton’s Celtic heritage. Each fall Musicians and audiences alike from across the island and all around the world gather at the week-long festival.

Nova Scotia, Canada

Bay Of Fundy

Bay of Fundy : World's Highest Tides!! 

The Bay of Fundy is one of the 7 wonders of North America. The highest tides on earth, the rarest whales in the world, semi-precious minerals and dinosaur fossils; all this convinced an international panel of experts in 2014 to choose the Bay of Fundy as one of the natural wonders of the world.

 

Why the Bay of Fundy is a Natural Wonder?

Located halfway between the equator and the north-pole on Canada’s stunning east coast, Fundy is a unique coastal environment. The Bay of Fundy is renowned not only for its tides but also for geological discoveries (dinosaur fossils) and marine life (whales).

New Brunswick, Canada